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Gary's Foods about us photos

“About Us” on your website

Everyone loves a story. People have been telling stories since… well, since people have been around! What do campfires, drawings in the sand, music, movies and your website have in common? All of these tools can help make telling a story easier.

The About Us page can attract your customers with a story they can relate to. The more your customers identify with you, the more they will trust your store. The content on this page is also good to share via links in social media.

Screen Shot 2015-11-02 at 1.35.19 PMRead this About Us example >>

You may not think your story is interesting, but it only seems that way to you because you lived it. You lived the long version, day by day. Believe it or not, millennials prefer the story of how a business came to be rather than having big bold SALE! messages crammed down their throats. These stories tend to be read on mobile devices during down time, like during the commercials while watching TV or waiting for a Dr. Apt.

Screen Shot 2015-11-02 at 1.40.57 PMWrite about the stories you hear over and over at family get togethers. I personally have one that makes the adults in our family smile.

Sometimes after a big rain, the school bus would get stuck in the mud on country dirt roads. Local farmers would pull school buses out of the mud with their tractors so kids could go to school.

What if the story isn’t yours personally? It’s the story about the store that matters, having the actual story teller working at the store to elaborate is just a bonus.

Click on each image to read a few more About Us examples:

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EVERYONE has a story, sometimes you just have to dig. What’s best is capturing it with an audio recording (use your phone) and then posting it online. Not only is the story there, it is told in the same voice customers are used to. Stories give your customers a chance to see the store in a new light. There are many obstacles to overcome when you own a store many customers don’t even consider. People also tend to be more understanding if they know the back story.

Here are some questions to think about when you get ready to tell your story:Screen Shot 2015-11-02 at 2.21.51 PM

    1. Where was the first store you worked at?
    2. How did you find the location of your first store? How old were you? Were you married and or have kids at the time?
    3. What kind of outside event or new service draw in the biggest crowd you’ve ever seen?
    4. Did you ever think one big decision you made resulted in a large impact on several other decisions made later on?
    5. What did you do before you owned a grocery store? How many of your ancestors were in the grocery or food industry?

Your story doesn’t have to be old either. Soon, people are going to want to know how you made it through the “Great Recession” or what helped you realize you needed to start a website.

Photos are also worth a thousand words. Maybe you have an old photo on the wall in the break room, or in a drawer. Making a collage out of these are a great way to show your customers you have a story worth reading. Put up a slider with the photos with a link to your About Us page to “read more”.

Here are a few examples of sliders we have made with store photos:

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larsonspw_slider_vintage

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If you have an About Us page and can drive traffic to it, your customers will associate your story with your store more so than your last Columbus Day Sale. Guaranteed.

Why do I work at AWG? “It’s hard to find a native Kansan who doesn’t have family living in a small town community... and I am no exception. My family tree is full of farmers who have helped put food on our tables for over 100 years. So when I hear of a small town’s only grocery store closing down it hits home. Even though I now live in a big city, I like to know through my work I can help keep small independent grocery stores stay open for future generations to enjoy.” -Sharlyn