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Webinar Recap: Personalization in Grocery Retail

The industrial revolution brought about producing and focusing on the masses. Now in the information age data is everything and the focus has moved from the masses to the individual. Personalization is a key factor in building loyalty. Whether that be for a store banner or a store brand. People are more receptive to something they feel is personalized towards them. This may be a fairly obvious point, but how does one go about personalizing a grocery store for one shopper? Truth is you can’t but the webinar I listened to busted 4 myths about personalization in grocery retail and also gave a few digital recommendations at the end for how to add more personalization for your shoppers. Myth 1: Shoppers want everything to be personalized. This has some truth to it because consumers consider the act of shopping an act of personalization in itself. Shoppers still want to maintain control but retailers should look to help them while also empowering them during their time in store. It is important that retailers don’t make their customizations feel manipulative to the…

Trends: A Look at Today’s Grocery Shopper Webinar Recap

State of the Grocery Market: 86% of all adults now say they have at least some of the responsibility for household grocery shopping. This is an important change because it is bringing in more consumers to the grocery retail world. In the past grocery shopping was fulfilled by one person, now that is only the case in 25% of US households. So, 75% of US households split the grocery shopping responsibility in some way making it a team sport. Sharing the shopping responsibility didn’t affect the number of trips like you would think. That number is around 1.6 trips per week and has remained fairly constant over the past 5 years. However, these lifestyle changes have made the biggest impact on trip frequency. Increases Trips: Reduced planning for meals Urbanization (People live, work, play, eat and shop all in the same neighborhood) Desire for freshness Decreases Trips: Sharing the shopping responsibilities Migration to online Increased reliance on food services The average weekly spend for a household is $113.50 which aligns with inflation. Of the shoppers that were surveyed only 13%…

Stores Still Need In-Store Signage

In-store signage has been shown to sell more product and increase profits. Advertised items are sold at full-retail and result in an average lift of 30.8%. This proves that shelf-signage still has real stopping power with customers. Shoppers are looking for in store experiences and products that utilize shelf signage are engaging with the shoppers at the most crucial time. Surprisingly some studies have shown that anywhere from 50.8 to 67.7% of purchases are impulse. So, one of the best ways to trigger these purchases is to catch the consumers eye with shelf signage. In the complex store environment, brands must navigate shoppers down the aisle, into the category and to the shelf where they can close the sale. At 10 feet you need to attract the shopper, 5 feet engages and at 2 feet you need to sell the product. This is the sometimes referred to as the 10 – 5 – 2 rule. This strategies success can be attributed to 76% of all purchasing decisions being made in-store at the shelf. It’s not that shoppers don’t know what…

The Future is the Shelf Edge

The digital world is infiltrating all aspects of grocery stores and supermarkets. Whether that be blockchain allowing consumers to track food from farm to store or gathering customer data through a loyalty program to offer tailored promotions. It has now even taken over one of the oldest parts of a store, the shelf but more specifically its edge. Paper and vinyl tags will soon become a thing of the past. The days of printing shelf tags and replacing them anytime a price changes or a sale is implemented will soon be a distant memory. Not only will these digital shelf edges allow you to change prices instantly it will also allow customers to look at online reviews or ratings of any product at the shelf while shopping. How’s that for point of purchase marketing? There hasn’t been much implementation of digital or electronic shelf edges in the United States yet but the UK has shown much success with utilizing this technology and all the advantages it offers. There are two separate types of digital shelf technologies. One uses the whole…

In-Store Dietician

Consumers needs and trends at the grocery store are constantly changing and becoming more involved. It’s not enough to offer the lowest price or the best customer service anymore. Consumers now expect an experience even when shopping for their weekly groceries. What does this mean for a retailer? You need to offer something in your store that adds more value to your customers shopping trips. Health and wellness have been on the rise and is a driving factor in grocery purchasing decisions. How could a store both increase value to a customer’s trip while also being conscious of health and wellness? According to the Food Marketing Institute 80% of grocery chains have dieticians either at the corporate or in store level. For example, Hy-Vee and ShopRite’s have had in store dieticians for years. This offers an in-store experience while still promoting healthy lifestyles and eating. These stores were ahead of the game but now even independent grocers are starting to add retail dieticians to their workforce. Your first question is probably, “What does a retail dietician do?” That answer will…

Purpose: Stand Out in a Crowded Market

Millennial shoppers will soon be the biggest purchasing group in the United States and are estimated to spend $600 billion each year. So, what does this mean to you? The marketing landscape is changing and you will now need to focus on the needs of the millennial generation. What do millennials want in a company? In a recent study they found that 81% of millennials expect companies to make a public commitment to charitable causes and citizenship. Traditionally consumers just “wanted” companies to incorporate social good into their business model but have come to expect it in recent years. In fact, 90% of Americans say they are more likely to trust and stay loyal to stores that actively try and make a difference. Now more than ever it is important to portray and actively pursue a socially responsible image. Studies have also shown that 88% of consumers would buy a product with a social or environmental benefit and an astounding 84% would tell friends and family about the companies cause. Turning your customers into your personal marketeers. Along those same…

The Mindful Millennial and Cause Marketing

Two of the biggest challenges facing grocery retail in 2018 will be millennials and mindfulness. With unlimited technology literally sitting in most customers pockets, mindfulness is going to be one of the biggest trends in 2018. Pew Research Center has predicted that millennials will surpass baby boomers as the largest living adult generation in 2019. This is changing the landscape of how grocery stores market themselves and do business. Price and quality are very comparable nowadays and millennials look to support causes when they shop. Visibility into the practices of businesses is the clearest it has ever been, so customers (mainly millennials) are now holding stores and companies accountable socially and ethically. 80% of consumers believe that businesses must play a role in addressing societal issues. So what does this all mean for grocery stores?   Two words: Cause Marketing. What is cause marketing? Cause marketing is when a company partners with a charitable organization to address a social or environmental problem. 91% of Americans want more products to support causes. So what can you do? AWG has the partner…

Pile of change.

Coin Counting Kiosks, Worth It?

How accurate are coin-counting machines? If you are like me you tend to question almost everything. So why not question the accuracy of a coin counting machine. It’s your money and it should be counted with as much accuracy as possible. I searched for articles or studies on just that and what I found wasn’t exactly what I expected. An Action News Special Investigation done by channel 6 ABC tested 3 separate options for coin counting kiosks. They tested TD Bank, PNC Bank, and Coinstar kiosks. Out of the 3 only Coinstar gave back the exact amount. TD and PNC bank either gave back extra or shorted the customer. This may look like a win for Coinstar but even if they gave back the correct amount they also charge an 11.9% fee for exchanging your coins. So you either use an inaccurate machine or you pay a fee.   Why would a retailer or a consumer want a coin counting kiosk? So with all the discrepancy in the accuracy of coin counting, why would a retailer want one in their…